All posts by Aidan

Consequences of survey method for estimating hunters’ harvest rates

We compare hunter recall interviews with continuous village monitoring, finding that methodological biases can have large effects on estimates of hunter catch.

New PhD opportunity: Understanding Public Opinions of Conservation

This project will examine current public opinion about conservation actions and investigate where, how and why public opinion is sought and used by different conservation organisations.

Using mixed methods to understand sensitive wildlife poisoning behaviours in northern Cambodia

Using the theory of planned behaviour, informant interviews and focus group discussions, we investigated drivers of wildlife poisoning across ten communities in northern Cambodia.

Estimating hunting prevalence and reliance on wild meat in Cambodia’s Eastern Plains

We assessed hunter behaviour, knowledge of rules, and perceptions of patrols amongst 705 households living within Keo Seima Wildlife Sanctuary, Cambodia

Species and demographic responses to wildlife‐friendly fencing on ungulate crossing success and behavior

Using camera trap data from three properties across the American Prairie Reserve, Montana, we investigated the effects of fencing on four ungulate species. Averaged across species and demographics, a wildlife‐friendly fencing design increased the probability that ungulates successfully crossed a fence and reduced the time taken to cross, but had limited effects on species' crossing behaviour.

The bean method as a tool to measure sensitive behaviour

Based on a simple voting system, the bean method is a practical, low‐cost way to obtain anonymous answers about sensitive topics.

Implications of the World Bank’s environmental and social framework for biodiversity

The World Bank's social and environmental safeguard policies were recently updated in the new Environmental and Social Framework. Although elements of the new policy have the potential to benefit conservation, Concerns have been raised that the policy is now too flexible and lacks clear definitions for key terms.

Intervener trustworthiness predicts cooperation with conservation interventions in an elephant conflict public goods game

We develop an experimental, framed public goods game to test how support for otherwise identical elephant conflict interventions varies with perceptions of the trustworthiness of two different intervening groups. Our result show that participants cooperate more with interveners they perceive to be more trustworthy and that different aspects of trustworthiness matter differentially.

Experimentally assessing the effect of search effort on snare detectability

Using an experimental approach, we investigated the effect of search effort, habitat, season, and team on rangers' detection of snares in a tropical forest landscape. Our results suggest that snare detectability in tropical forest landscapes is likely to be low, and may not improve dramatically with increased search effort.

Making Messy Data Work for Conservation

We present an overview of the opportunities and limitations associated with "messy" data: unstructured observational data, such as citizen science records or ranger patrol observations. We explain how the preferences, skills, and incentives of data collectors affect the quality of the information they contain and the investment required to unlock their potential.